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if (like me) you ever wondered whatever happend to the top-level domains of former eastern bloc states:
.dd (east germany): withdrawn in 1990, never used "on the net", just in university networks
.su (soviet union): still in use, even though it probably shouldn't be, ~117.000 domains
.yu (yugoslavia): deleted in 2010, ~4000 domains vanished
.cs (czechoslovakia): deleted in 1995, 114 domains vanished

@selea
Ya I was just going to reply that. But they are a little pricey compared to other TLD's and there is lots of paperwork including sending a copy of your ID off to someone in russia.

@junkman

I found them for about 15 EUR per year, not that picy

And yes, both .ru and .su wants your ID

@aurora The .cs domain first appeared in the IANA registry in October 1990, i.e. 10 months after the fall of communism in Czechoslovakia at the end of 1989. The first second level domain was registered in October 1991 by the Institute of Applied Cybernetics in Bratislava.

.cs was replaced in 1994 by the .cz and .sk top level domains.

source (in Czech): nic.cz/public_media/IT12/preze

@aurora I wonder if we have any archives of some of these .yu websites.

@aurora okay so like, theoretically, how would one go about snagging a .su domain in 2020?

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